June 2018 Money Diary: Removing Stress from Personal Finance

Jennie here.

Another month has come and gone. Let’s get right to it!

 
June 2018 Money Diary The Origami Life.png
 

The Origami Life Couple’s
Expenses in June 2018:


 

The Origami Life - June 2018 Expenses via Goodbudget

 
  1. Rent and Bills ($1,656.00)
    Per usual, our rent and bills account for about 50% of our total expenses. This will be the one of the last rent payments we make for the foreseeable future. In July, we’ve given notice to our landlord and our last day in Los Angeles will be July 31st. Then it’s three weeks in Albuquerque to spend time with my family before it’s off to the first stop on our RTW trip - Hawaii!
     
  2. Groceries ($192.00) and Eating Out & Entertainment ($312.00)
    This past month, we didn’t spend very much on groceries because we’ve been traveling quite a bit (to Albuquerque for Father’s Day, and to SF again). By the numbers, it looks like we got lazy, but what actually happened was that we shifted our spending a bit.
     

  3. Quarterly Charitable Donations ($250.00)
    We aim to donate at least 3% of our budget on a quarterly basis to causes we care about. This month, we’re giving to GiveDirectly again. Direct transfers are cool! Say yes to efficiency and choice, and say no to bureaucracy, friction and good intentions.
     

  4. Miscellaneous ($162.00) and Family ($161.00)
    June miscellaneous and family expenses came from two things: (1) visiting my family in New Mexico for Father’s Day weekend with many dinners, lunches, and some gifts and (2) morning coffee dates together.
     

  5. Business Expenses ($70.00)
    New category! In June, I went on a quick trip to San Francisco (fully comped by a third-party - will talk about this in a future post) and spent some coffee money on client meetings for our business.
     

  6. Life Happens ($44.00)
    We both got new glasses in June and had to put down some cash for our eye exam co-pay (hate the machine that blows air into your eyes). Also, Ivan got really depressed while I was away and gorged himself on a Fatburger turkey sandwich and a Maui Banana milkshake. Ivan’s note: the milkshake wasn’t good. Should’ve stuck with chocolate or vanilla.
     

  7. Travel ($23.00)
    Earlier this year, we were fortunate enough to score a Southwest Companion Pass through a California-exclusive offering. We’ve been traveling for the past six months on this Companion Pass - wherever Ivan goes, I go and all we have to do is pay and additional tax/fees. So in June we used some of our points to book a flight to New Mexico from California and only had to pay the tax ($23.00) on the Companion Pass flight.


Thoughts On Money in June 2018:

What Does Money Mean To Me?


 
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If you had asked me the following question three or four years ago: what does money mean to you? I wouldn’t have known how to answer such a question.

Thinking back - money was a constant source of anxiety and stress for me.

I don’t think I really understood the true power of personal savings until the last two years. I mean, I grew up thinking I’d never have money - that I was defined and limited by my lower class upbringing. It’s been a long journey but somehow Ivan has helped me sort out my financial life and helped me think more step back and look more at “the big picture”.

For the last six months, Ivan and I have traveled every single month (both together and separately). We’ve used this as a sort of mini warm-up to our RTW trip. Four years ago, I would have never fathomed the idea that I’d feel so comfortable and unafraid.
 

How do I feel about money now?


Once my finances were finally “in order”, the biggest emotion I felt was: relief.

I don’t really stress about money anymore. Well, occasionally but that’s because Ivan likes to “freak out” from time to time, but it’s usually not a problem because we’ve built in buffers to our budget.

Once you take the first steps to managing your budget, those types of things are ingrained in you and are woven into your psyche. Your relationship to waste, money, and savings changes - for the better. It becomes a living and breathing idea in the back of your mind.

Ivan has been publishing our Back to Basics series recently, and we hope it will be helpful to the readers out there who are still figuring their personal finances out. I’ll be writing some of the future posts on negotiations and relationships (Ivan: I’m not qualified to talk about the latter).

Here are the “Back to Basics” posts we’ve published so far:

  1. Back to Basics: Understanding The Money Game

  2. Back to Basics: How to Think About Your Paycheck

  3. Back to Basics: Making A Budget

See you next week!